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Archive for March 19th, 2008

Brilliant idea. It’s like having people act out your old VCR instruction manual.

As is says in it’s intro, these people perform a short piece that was written in English, translated (with babelfish – the online translation software) into French, then translated into German, then back into French and finally back into English.

The results are predictably horrible but they are kind enough to subtitle it with the original English. I promise there’s hardly any resemblance whatsoever!

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Arthur C Clarke Arthur C. Clarke died on March 18 – a visionary of the space age. He may be most remembered for ‘2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY’ which was developed from a 1951 (?) story “The Sentinel”. Kudos to anyone who knows what “The Sentinel” was about.

He also said:

Behind every man now alive stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living. Since the dawn of time, roughly a hundred billion human beings have walked the planet Earth. Now this is an interesting number, for by a curious coincidence there are approximately a hundred billion stars in our local universe, the Milky Way. So for every man who has ever lived, in this universe, there shines a star.

– (from Clarke’s foreword in 2001, A Space Odyssey, 1968)

He was a scientist whose work with satellites led to the coining of the term a “Clarke orbit.” He foresaw the use of communications satellites – without which we wouldn’t have GPS or TV…. He was a visionary award-winning science fiction author who influenced several generations of writers and became an icon of the SF subculture. He was a prolific writer of more than 100 books, several of which, “Childhood’s End” and “Rendezvous with Rama” were startling reading. Resquiescat Intra Astra (and a free trip to the Quicky Mart to anyone who translates that).

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