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Posts Tagged ‘sci-fi’

Before we get to anything else in this post, can I just say, I love the font and the titles for this show.  Seriously, not a huge thing, but I really do love them. 

 

 

Let’s go over the clichés before we get to the new stuff.  Our character (creature-monster-villain-hapless experimentee) for the week is a stock character.  We’ve all seen this guy before.  The hapless loser who has a dead end job and lives at home with his overbearing, sick mother.  The poor sucker will gain strange mysterious powers which will not help him get the girl of him dreams (who he is mildly stalking), but in fact cause him to lose his job.  This time we even gave the guy a funny name, Meeker, pronounced meager, which is a little punny. 

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Let’s start off with what was good;  I didn’t feel there were as many clichés in this episode as there have been.  The other good thing – no trip to Massive Dynamic this week.  Also, we still have the cow.  And, I’m really starting to like the cow.

 

Unfortunately, I’m still not entirely sure what this episode was really about. The A-plot was less a cliché, and more a movie trick: The MacGuffin.  Typically, the MacGuffin is used to move the plot forward, but in this instance, it was used to move the entire A-plot, which really is a sign of lazy writing. [Ed. Note: A MacGuffin is “a plot device which uses an ambiguous object to motivate the pricinple characters”.  Think: golden glowing briefcase in Pulp Fiction].

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Arthur C Clarke Arthur C. Clarke died on March 18 – a visionary of the space age. He may be most remembered for ‘2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY’ which was developed from a 1951 (?) story “The Sentinel”. Kudos to anyone who knows what “The Sentinel” was about.

He also said:

Behind every man now alive stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living. Since the dawn of time, roughly a hundred billion human beings have walked the planet Earth. Now this is an interesting number, for by a curious coincidence there are approximately a hundred billion stars in our local universe, the Milky Way. So for every man who has ever lived, in this universe, there shines a star.

– (from Clarke’s foreword in 2001, A Space Odyssey, 1968)

He was a scientist whose work with satellites led to the coining of the term a “Clarke orbit.” He foresaw the use of communications satellites – without which we wouldn’t have GPS or TV…. He was a visionary award-winning science fiction author who influenced several generations of writers and became an icon of the SF subculture. He was a prolific writer of more than 100 books, several of which, “Childhood’s End” and “Rendezvous with Rama” were startling reading. Resquiescat Intra Astra (and a free trip to the Quicky Mart to anyone who translates that).

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